Archive for the ‘home, house, building’ Category

LETTERS

August 8, 2017

Just Sayin'

When is the last time you wrote a letter? When is the last time you received one? In our age of texts and emojis, letters have dwindled. When I wrote WITH LOVE, WHEREVER YOU ARE, I was able to study over 600 letters written by my parents serving in WW2. Who preserves texts, even for the life of the phone? I decided I’d write a novel totally in letters. The result is JUST SAYIN’, a middle-grade novel in letters. The postmark and setting are Hamilton, MO, where I grew up.

KIDS STILL SAY THE DARNDEST THINGS

July 21, 2017

babysitters

This post only makes sense if you saw my last posting about Art Linkletter and his classic, KIDS SAY THE DARNDEST THINGS. Here are a few kid quotes from the sequel I was honored to write: KIDS ARE STILL SAYING THE DARNDEST THINGS:

Q: What does God look like?

A: He’s really, really, really old–like 23. But He never looks a day older every time you see him.

Q: What makes God angry?

A: When his creations turn out too good . . like cockroaches and my brother.

Q: Why do you think we have mothers?

A: She’s the only one who knows where the Scotch Tape is???

Q: Who’s the boss at your house?

A: My dad’s the boss of our house . . . until Grandma comes over. Then he’s just one of us.

So many kid quotes in this book have shown up on the Internet. I’ve received forwarded emails from friends who thought I could use a good laugh. Only, all the quotes were from my book.

Finally, the three beauties in this picture are my granddaughters. Maybe I feel another book coming on: GRANDKIDS SAY THE DARNDEST THINGS.

WITH LOVE, . . . Whatever I Was

June 20, 2017

Nurse Dandi

I just ran across this photo yesterday. (And I probably should have kept running.) It’s funny because last week Joe (my wonderful husband) asked me if I ever wanted to be a nurse or doctor like my parents. I said no. I always wanted to be a horse trainer or a writer. And yet, here I am, nursing a bandaged doll. But I didn’t play with dolls. I preferred plastic horses. My big sister, Maureen, wanted to be a nurse from the moment she was born . . . until her biology class had to pith a frog. She loved to play hospital with her dolls. So I’m guessing she made me do it.

May 26, 2017

sillouettes

If all goes as expected, I should be arriving in Hamilton tonight, after a 2-day drive with Joe and Ellie and Cassie, ages 6 and 9. Then tomorrow we’ll all be at the public library/J.C. Penney Museum for two talks/readings/book signings. At 10, I get to talk mainly to kids. At 11, I’ll talk about the stories and letters behind WITH LOVE WHEREVER YOU ARE.

My roots are deep in Hamilton, and this picture is of my family. Dad was the family photographer, but Mom created these silhouettes. I remember sitting behind a sheet while lights and camera clicked on the other side of the sheet. In case you can’t guess, Mom and Dad are on top. Then Maureen (left) and Dandi. And last, Susie, our Dalmatian. Apparently, my first word was “Susie.”sillouettes (2)

I tried to lighten the silhouettes, but I’m not sure if these are better or worse. So, I’m including both. Sorry!

MY HAMILTON HOME–Wherever we are..

May 16, 2017

Soon I’ll be back in Hamilton, Missouri, where I grew up. If you’ve read WITH LOVE, WHEREVER YOU ARE, you know that Frank (my dad) grew up in Hamilton too. After WW2 ended, Frank and Helen (my mom) had big plans to set up a practice out East. They liked the Washington D.C. area and Arlington, where they were finishing their stint as Army doctor and Army nurse. Frank dreamed of starting his own practice in Florida, close to a beach and good tennis courts. Helen wasn’t a fan of the heat, but she wanted to live in a big city.

They ended up in Hamilton, Missouri, a small town with no beach, no tennis court, and no city, unless you drove an hour south to Kansas City. Dr. Frank Daley took over the practice of his dad, Dr. Daley, “temporarily,” when Pete had a heart attack. Helen and Frank never left. They built their first house–that’s it in the bottom left picture, with the oil drum in view. A few years later, they’d saved enough money to build onto the house. I think you can figure out the stages in the pictures from over the years, as they saved, then added on. My husband, Joe, and I adopted the same policy and only built onto our house when we’d saved the money to do it. I guess this is only one of the many things learned in Hamilton.

http://www.dandibooks.com